StradFest 2018 | How will you shape your tomorrow?

How will you shape your FUTURE?

Join The Strad team and leading music industry experts at London’s Royal Institution of Great Britain for a one-day immersive event designed to help string players develop an exciting career.

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Exhibitions and stands

The Strad Exhibition will feature rare and beautiful images of some of the world’s greatest string players – all of which have appeared in The Strad during its 129-year history. Included in the display will be photographs of Jacqueline du Pré, Yehudi Menuhin, Nigel Kennedy, Isaac Stern, Jascha Heifetz and Daniel Hope.

London-based artist and violinist Leonardo Frigo has been transforming stringed instruments into pieces of visual art for the past decade. Through painted symbols and patterns he invites audiences to engage with instruments in fresh and interesting ways. Stradfest presents an exclusive gallery of Leonardo Frigo originals and an opportunity to meet the artist, who will be creating a new piece during the event.

Plus visit exhibition stands dedicated to luthiers, dealers, conservatoires and schools.

Esther Abrami
violinist

Segun Akinola
composer

Catarina Amon
Classeek founder

Gordon Back
Menuhin Competition

Pavel Berman
Lugano Conservatory

Nicholas Bootiman
Philharmonia Orchestra

Alexander Buhr
Decca Classics

Rodney Friend
Royal Academy of Music

Charlotte Gardner
music journalist

Hannah Goodwin
Guildhall School

Max Grosch
Yamaha Artist

Matthew Jones, violist, violinist, Performance Health Consultant
Guildhall School

Klanner Franz
Thomastik-Infeld

Patrick Lemanski
Warner Music UK

Victor Martin
Classeek CTO

Ed Milner
HarrisonParrott

Simon Morris
J & A Beare

Mark Messenger, Head of strings, violin professor, Royal College of Music
Royal College of Music

Gyorgy Pauk
Royal Academy of Music

Tara Persaud
Solea Management

François Rive
cellist

Rosalie Segal, tutor, Mary Ward Centre
Alexander technique

Steven Smith
J & A Beare

Dinah Stabb
Guildhall School

agenda
the_programme

Royal Institution of Great Britain

21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS
09.15 – 18.00, 24 March 2019

Talks and panel discussions

- Succeeding in competitions -

10.00-10.40
– Theatre –

How to make an impact on the competition circuit and distinguish yourself from the crowd. Are successful candidates those who perform with careful attention to accuracy and detail, or those who take stylistic and musical risks? The experts share their views.

Panel:
Gordon Back, Menuhin Competition artistic director (chair)
Pavel Berman, violinist, master teacher iClassical, Lugano Conservatory professor
Rodney Friend, violinist, Royal Academy of Music professor
György Pauk, violinist, master teacher iClassical, Royal Academy of Music professor

- Conservatoire entrance auditions -

10.50-11.30
– Theatre –

Choosing the right conservatoire or university to further your musical development is an important decision. This session covers course and teacher selection, bursaries and grants, and the conservatoire audition process.

Speaker:
Mark Messenger, Royal College of Music head of strings

- Creating a digital portfolio -

11.30-12.10
– Library –

How to improve your public profile by creating a professional-looking website and engaging a loyal audience via social media. Topics include successful blogging, impactful biographies and photography, and creating video and audio recordings that look and sound professional.

Speaker:
Ed Milner, HarrisonParrott associate director, artist management

- What record companies are looking for -

11.40-12.20
– Theatre –

Experts from leading record labels discuss what they look for when signing a new artist and how best to capture the right type of attention. Also discussed are the pros and cons of self-produced albums.

Panel:
Alexander Buhr, Decca Classics managing director
Christian Girardin, Harmonia Mundi artistic director
Patrick Lemanski, Warner Music UK head of classics
Charlotte Gardner, music critic and journalist (chair)

- The importance of social media -

12.20-12.50
– Library –

How social media platforms can exponentially boost your profile as an artist.

Speaker:
Esther Abrami, violinist and Gewa Soloist

- The world of Stradivari -

12.30-1.10
– Theatre –

Antonio Stradivari and Guarneri ‘del Gesú’ represent the pinnacle of violin making, but acquiring an instrument to suit any pocket can be a tricky business. A talk about how to approach choosing a new instrument, and how to compare tonal attributes and playability.

Speakers:
Simon Morris, J & A Beare managing director
Robert Brewer Young, luthier

- Alternative careers for musicians -

1.00-1.40
– Library –

Professionals share advice on pursuing musical careers outside the traditional playing and teaching routes – such as arts administration, programme direction, music journalism and broadcasting, public relations, artist management, music licensing, film/video game scoring, and audio engineering.

Panel:
Tara Persaud, Solea Management associate director (chair)
Segun Akinola, film and TV composer
Charlotte Gardner, music critic and journalist

- Joining an orchestra -

1.30-2.10
– Theatre –

Experts speak about building an orchestral career, with a particular focus on navigating the tricky auditioning process and probationary periods.

Panel:
François Rive, cellist, former Royal Philharmonic Orchestra principal (chair)
Nicholas Bootiman, Philharmonia Orchestra viola no.2
Robert Smissen, Academy of St Martin in the Fields principal viola

- The power of stage presence -

1.30-2.30
– Conversation Room –

What are the key ingredients for delivering a powerful and memorable performance? How do you command the stage and manage performance nerves? We explore the secrets of effective self-presentation.

Session leaders:
Matthew Jones, violist, Guildhall School of Music and Drama professor
Dinah Stabb, actor, Guildhall School of Music and Drama professor

- How to get the best from your instrument -

2.00-2.30
– Library –

Why finding the right set of strings to match your instrument is so important in terms of sound production.

Speaker:
Franz Klanner, Thomastik-Infeld head of development

- Instrument loans -

2.40-3.10
– Conversation Room –

Loans through foundations and dealers can help players access instruments that might ordinarily exceed their budget. Find out everything you need to know about bettering your instrument.

Speaker:
Steven Smith, J & A Beare director

 

- Practising in fifths -

2.40-3.20
– Library –

A revolutionary new technique to help string players.

Speaker:
Rodney Friend, violinist, Royal Academy of Music professor

- The body is a temple -

3.35-4.15
– Library –

Diet and exercise are key for performing musicians, who often lead highly stressful and demanding lives. Avoiding injury, maintaining energy levels and achieving psychological groundedness can all be linked to healthy living. Nutritionists and fitness experts weigh in on the benefits of healthy eating, yoga, Alexander technique and more.

Panel:
Claire Cordeaux, BAPAM director
Hannah Goodwin, Guildhall School senior health and welfare advisor
Rosalie Segal, Alexander technique specialist

- String technology -

3.50-4.30
– Demonstration Room –

The past few years have thrown up a wealth of innovative apps and websites to aid practice, learning and professional development. If you haven’t factored technology into your practice routine and career planning, now is the time to do so with this session focusing on the coolest programmes and websites on the market.

Speakers:
Catarina Amon, Classeek founder and CEO
Victor Martin, Classeek CTO
Ariel Lang & Pedro Silva, co-founders, MyLuthier

Performing and networking

- Introduction to improv -

10.00-1.20
– Conversation Room –

Composers and performers of the past were highly skilled in the art of improvisation, but many string players today find this a daunting prospect. Come along to these friendly, introduction sessions, develop your performing skills, and experience various styles and creative possibilities for stringed instruments.

Session leader:
Max Grosch, jazz violinist and Yamaha Artist

- Silent quartet roulette -

11.00-12.00
– Demonstration Room –

A chance to meet like-minded musicians looking to form a string quartet or ensemble: violinists, violists and cellists will have the opportunity to play chamber music together on Yamaha electric stringed instruments with headphones, and to move between groups to try out different player combinations.

- Strad Talks -

2.30-3.40
– Demonstration Room –

Leading performers discuss their careers paths – an opportunity for informal discussion.

Speakers:
Pavel Berman, violinist, master teacher iClassical, Lugano Conservatory professor
György Pauk, violinist, master teacher iClassical, Royal Academy of Music professor

- Fine-tune your instrument -

– Mezzanine –

J & A Beare luthiers present mini workshops on the care and restoration of instruments, focusing on routine maintenance and protection. Bring in your own instrument for a health check and assessment.

Concert

- Anne Akiko Meyers -

5.00-6.00
– Theatre –

Leading violin soloist Anne Akiko Meyers has performed with the world’s finest orchestras and has released 37 albums, many of which have topped the US Billboard classical chart. A champion of contemporary composers, Meyers performs on the 1741 ‘Vieuxtemps’ Guarneri ‘del Gesù’, currently the world’s most expensive instrument.

Exhibitions

- Photo Exhibition -

9.15-4.30
– Georgian Room –

The Strad Exhibition will feature rare and beautiful images of some of the world’s greatest string players – all of which have appeared in The Strad during its 129-year history. Included in the display will be photographs of Jacqueline du Pré, Yehudi Menuhin, Nigel Kennedy, Isaac Stern, Jascha Heifetz and Daniel Hope.

- Art Exhibition -

9.15-4.30
– Ante Room –

London-based artist and violinist Leonardo Frigo has been transforming stringed instruments into pieces of visual art for the past decade. Through painted symbols and patterns he invites audiences to engage with instruments in fresh and interesting ways. Stradfest presents an exclusive gallery of Leonardo Frigo originals and an opportunity to meet the artist, who will be creating a new piece during the event.

Please note that the programme is subject to change. Any updates will be posted on this website.
Download a copy of the programmeDownload a Royal Institution floor plan

Contact

To find out about sponsorship and exhibition opportunities, please email Kirsten Lloyd

For any event related enquiries, please email Riza Jones

Joining us? Get tickets here

SPECIAL OFFER: For a limited period, get 50% off the cost of ALL tickets (use discount code TS50) – book NOW to avoid disappointment. Discounts will be applied at the end of the booking process.

£24.50 (incl VAT) $
General admission
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£49.00

Ticket includes:
All day admission with access to all sessions (subject to availability)
Admission to the concert
3-month digital subscription to The Strad (worth £12.99)

£73.50 (incl VAT) $
Group deal
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£147.00

Tickets include:
All day admission with access to all sessions (subject to availability)
Admission to the concert
3-month digital subscription to The Strad (worth £12.99)

Please note: delegates under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent, or a guardian over 18 years of age.

Royal Institution of Great Britain

Information

The Royal Institution

21 Albemarle St, Mayfair, London W1S 4BS

By tube

The closest tube station to the Royal Institution is Green Park on the Jubilee, Victoria and Piccadilly lines. The Royal Institution is a five-minute walk from the station. Also, within a ten minute walking distance is Piccadilly Circus tube station, on the Piccadilly and Bakerloo lines, or Oxford Circus tube station on the Victoria, Central and Bakerloo lines.

By bus

There are numerous bus stops along Piccadilly which runs along the entrance to Albemarle Street.

Bus numbers 9, 14, 19, 22 and 38 all run along Piccadilly, which connects with Albemarle Street

By bicycle

There is parking for bicycles located around the corner from the Royal Institution, on Bond Street.

By car

Travelling to the Royal Institution by car is inadvisable as there is only limited and expensive parking available nearby. Please note that the Royal Institution is located within the Congestion Charging zone.

Toilets

Accessible and standard toilets are located on the ground floor in the reception area.

Lift

There is one main scenic lift located in the Atrium. All floor levels are announced.

Cloakroom

There is a small manned cloakroom on the ground floor in the reception area.

Accessible car parking

Parking spaces for disabled visitors near The Royal Institution. Four spaces for Blue Badge holders on Mayfair Place. Three spaces for Blue Badge holders on Cork Street. For other local Blue Badge parking please visit: www.disabledmotoring.org/

Drop off points

Albemarle Street has metered parking so offers limited opportunity for drop offs.

Entrance to the Royal Institution

The Royal Institution has two main entrances, both on Albemarle St. Both are accessible via double doors

Wheelchair access for exhibition and events

All public areas are wheelchair accessible via the scenic lift in the Atrium. Floor levels are announced. The theatre can accommodate 8 wheelchair users.

Guide and hearing dogs

We welcome guide dogs and hearing dogs at the Royal Institution. Water bowls are available – just ask a member of staff.

Sound enhancement system / Induction loops

Induction loops operate in the Theatre. Please ask a member of staff for details.

Below is a list of hotels within easy reach of the Royal Institution of Great Britain.

We are unable to offer discounted rates but would suggest using an online booking site such  as www.booking.com, www.trivago.co.uk or www.hotelscombined.com to compare and secure the best rates.

  • Hilton London Green Park
  • The Westbury
  • Le Méridien Piccadilly
  • Holiday Inn London Mayfair
  • The Chesterfield Mayfair
  • The Stafford London
  • Fleming’s Hotel
  • The Nadler Victoria
  • COMO, The Halkin
  • 9 Hertford Street, Mayfair
  • Brown’s Hotel
  • The May Fair Hotel

How do I buy a ticket for Stradfest?
Tickets can be purchased via the Stradfest website. Click here to go directly to the booking platform.

I’m under 16, can I still attend?
There are no restrictions but delegates aged 16 and under will need to be accompanied by a parent, or a guardian over the age of 18.

I’d like to bring a large party to Stradfest, can I?
Yes, if you’re looking to book a block of tickets and would like more information on our special rates, please email events@thestrad.com

What does my ticket include?
Tickets include all day admission with access to speaker, panel and interactive sessions (subject to availability), admission to Anne Akiko Meyers’ concert and a 3-month digital subscription to The Strad.

Does my ticket include lunch?
Lunch and other refreshments are not included.  There is a small café located on the ground floor of the Royal Institution where you will be able to purchase hot and cold drinks and snacks.  Please be aware that seating is limited. There are also numerous coffee shops, cafés and convenience stores (including Starbucks, Costa Coffee, Paul, Pret and Marks and Spencer) within easy walking distance of the venue.  Please note: food and drink not purchased at the Royal Institution can not be consumed on site, so you will need to plan any breaks around the sessions you want to attend.  You are free to leave and return to the Royal Institution throughout the day.

What time should I arrive and when does Stradfest finish?
Doors open at 9.15am and the day will begin with a welcome from The Strad’s editor, Charlotte Smith, at 9.45am.  The first session will commence promptly at 10am.  The concert takes place from 5.00-6.00pm and delegates will be seated in the theatre from 4.30pm onwards.  Stradfest closes at 6pm.

Is there a cloakroom?
Yes, there is a cloakroom that is free of charge for your use throughout the day. Please note that while the cloakroom is staffed, all personal belongings are left at owners risk.

Do I need to book sessions in advance?
For the vast majority of sessions, admission is on a first come, first served basis.  Numbers are restricted for some sessions due to room capacities so if you are keen to attend a particular session, we advise you to make your way to the meeting room in good time for the start. Some of the interactive sessions (Introduction to improv, Silent quartet roulette and Fine tune your instrument) need to be booked in advance and you will be able to do this via the online booking platform when you purchase your ticket.

Are tickets refundable?
We are unable to offer refunds but if you cannot attend and can find someone to take your place, we’re happy to accept a substitution. Contact events@thestrad.com for further information.

Got a question that you can’t see the answer to above?
Please contact the event manager at riza.jones@thestrad.com

How will you shape your FUTURE?

Join us on Sunday 24 March 2019